Wynne Jones IP’s experts speak out for World IP Day

Wynne Jones IP’s experts speak out for World IP Day

Grace Mason-Jarrett - Senior Trainee Patent Attorney


Why did you decide to enter the IP profession?

I came across the profession more by chance than anything else, and found the more I looked into it the more interested I was. It seemed to fit my skills and my abilities, and would be challenging enough to keep me interested. I was looking for a career that would stimulate me after university, and still allow me to use my degree. I didn’t feel like going into data analysis or lab technician-type jobs. This profession seemed to fit everything I was looking for.


What is the one key piece of advice you'd always give to clients about IP?

Speak to an attorney before you disclose anything, and if you’re not sure, ask! Disclosure can be particularly damaging to your ability to obtain valid IPR.


What is the one misconception clients always have about IP?

“IP is too expensive for SME’s and individual inventors to enforce, and so it isn’t worth having”. Actually, although enforcing your IPR in courts can inflate costs quite significantly, a large proportion of infringement cases never get to court. Often infringement is accidental and notification that you have IPR is enough to deter would-be infringers from continuing. There are also a multitude of options available to help businesses settle disputes outside of court, and may even result in licensing deals which benefit both parties. Besides, IP is a significant business asset, all types of IP add value to the business, and it is often worth registering and keeping a record of for the benefits it provides in this respect.


Do you think the IP profession is more inclusive in 2018?

Although I have only been in the professional a short while, I believe many firms have been growing over the past 10 or so years. Certainly during my time here at Wynne-Jones IP I have seen the company grow with the establishment of the Training Academy and an ever increasing number of trainees.


Why do you think it is important to celebrate IP Day?

It’s important to get the word out there about IP and remind people how useful IP can be.

Tasha Collins - Trainee Patent Attorney

Why did you decide to enter the IP profession?

I did a year in industry and realised that a job as an engineer probably wasn’t for me.  However, I still wanted to be able to use the knowledge gained from my mechanical engineering degree, and so a trainee patent attorney role seemed ideal.

What is the one misconception clients always have about IP?

That the process of applying for a patent is cheap and quick - it’s not!!

Do you think the IP profession is more inclusive in 2018?

I’ve only been in the profession for 18 months, so I don’t feel I can pass a full judgement.  However, there is always room for improvement where inclusivity is concerned, regardless of your profession.

Why do you think it is important to celebrate IP Day?

So that IP becomes more widely known and recognised by the general public so that all businesses will realise the importance of IP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rebecca Quiney - Senior Trainee Patent Attorney

Why did you decide to enter the IP profession?

I studied Biochemistry at university and wanted to pursue a career in which I could continue to use and develop the knowledge that I had gained throughout my degree without being stuck behind a lab bench. Having also been interested in law, IP seemed like an ideal combination of the two disciplines.

What is the one key piece of advice you'd always give to clients about IP?

Do not wait until it is too late to start thinking about protecting your IP! In particular, make sure that you do not publicly disclose your invention before you file a patent application as this may jeopardise the patentability of your invention. If you are unsure, always contact your IP attorney to ask.


What is the one misconception clients always have about IP?

It is common for new clients to not understand what each of the different types of IP can be used to protect - new clients often think that all IP falls under the umbrella of ‘copyright’.  However, this is not the case. For example, patents can be used to protect technical innovation, trademarks can be used to protect brands and registered designs can be used to protect the appearance of products.


Do you think the IP profession is more inclusive in 2018?

The impression that I have been given by attorneys that have been in the profession a little longer than myself is that the IP profession was traditionally viewed as being quite an elitist and male dominated profession. However, with initiatives such as the IP Inclusive initiative, I do think that this is improving over time.  


Why do you think it is important to celebrate IP Day?

To raise awareness of the importance of IP to all businesses.

Christina Schiavone - Senior Trainee Patent Attorney

 

Why did you decide to enter the IP profession?

I decided to enter the IP profession because it combines my love of science and technology with my love for continuously learning new things.  The law is continuously changing and as such I am always studying and learning, so that I can offer my clients relevant and up-to-date advice.  I also enjoy the challenges which the profession offers, no two days are the same, and I am constantly kept on my toes by clients.


What is the one key piece of advice you'd always give to clients about IP?

Do not disclose your invention before filing a patent application!  Sometimes inventors get quite excited about their creations, and do not take the necessary measures to keep it secret.  Disclosing your invention pre-filing can affect the validity of any granted patent obtained, and thus you may struggle to enforce your rights against any third parties copying your invention.  If someone else is able to copy your invention, then you will lose out on the market monopoly and any potential profit!

 

What is the one misconception clients always have about IP?

Compared to other forms of IP, many small clients are shocked at how expensive and lengthy the patent process is.  This can make it difficult for individuals to pursue protection for their creations. However, we are able to provide advice on where individuals can apply for funding to assist them through the patent process.

 

Do you think the IP profession is more inclusive in 2018? 

It’s hard to say, however bodies such as IP Inclusive have been set up to make the profession more inclusive and diverse, so there was obviously a need to improve the inclusiveness in the profession.  I think that going forward this can only be a positive thing for both individuals and the profession as a whole.


Why do you think it is important to celebrate IP Day?

Many businesses still do not take IP very seriously, and do not appreciate the positive influence it can have on their growth and profits.  IP rights provide individuals and businesses with a monopoly in the market, such that only they can profit from their creations.  It is important to raise awareness of how much IP can benefit businesses, and by celebrating World IP Day, we can help to spread the word and educate businesses on the role IP can play in their overall strategy.

 

 

 

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