99 Problems and counterfeit merchandise is one!

99 Problems and counterfeit merchandise is one!

Image source: Instagram/Beyonce 2018 

It seems that superstars Jay Z and Beyoncé can now add counterfeit merchandise to their list of 99 Problems.

The musical power couple have taken out a restraining order banning the sale of fake T shirts and other items during the American leg of their On The Run Tour II.

According to reports the restraining order would enable local authorities to seize any unofficial goods which were being sold outside their concert venues.

The singing duo took the measure after fellow stars Katy Perry, Pink, and Lady Gaga also successfully obtained similar orders to prevent counterfeit sales during their performances.

Katy Perry and Lady Gaga’s official merchandise company, Bravado International, has previously filed law suits against counterfeit sellers operating outside their shows.

This comes as figures from the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) revealed that international trade in counterfeit and pirated products is now worth up to £300 billion.

While this measure may seem extreme to some, the sale of counterfeit products can actually have a hugely detrimental effect, not just for the artists themselves, but for the consumers too.

Beyoncé and Jay Z are shining a light on a significant problem which has plagued performers and others responsible for producing legitimate merchandise for a number of years.

Unofficial goods are quite likely to be inferior in quality which will ultimately serve to damage the brand and its reputation.

Consumers may think they are getting a bargain, but in actual fact they are getting a vastly inferior product, which could even be a safety risk if it hasn’t been quality tested.

While the singers may be the latest to adopt this legal measure, we are sure they won’t be the last, as brands continue to explore new ways to protect their IP against infringement.

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